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How Long Does Suboxone Withdrawal Last

How Long Does Suboxone Withdrawal Last

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What Exactly is Suboxone Withdrawal? 

Are you searching about how long does suboxone withdrawal last as you have just stopped using Suboxone? Then you should know that According to a study published in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, around of 87% people who stop taking Suboxone experience withdrawal symptoms.

Likewise, Suboxone withdrawal symptoms usually begin within 1-3 days after the last dose and can last up to 2 weeks or longer, depending on the individual and the extent of their use.

But what exactly is suboxone withdrawal? It refers to the physical and psychological symptoms that occur when a person taking Suboxone (a medication used to treat opioid addiction) for a prolonged period suddenly stops or significantly reduces their dose.

When someone stops taking Suboxone, their body may experience withdrawal symptoms as it adjusts to the absence of the drug. 

In this article, addiction specialists at Addicted recovery will uncover the truth about how long does suboxone withdrawal last. 

What Makes Suboxone Addictive?

Suboxone is a prescription medication used to treat opioid addiction. It contains two active ingredients: 

  • Buprenorphine
  • Naloxone. 

Buprenorphine is an opioid partial agonist, which means it can produce effects similar to other opioids but to a lesser degree. Naloxone is an opioid antagonist which blocks the effects of opioids.

While Suboxone is effective in treating opioid addiction and reducing withdrawal symptoms, it can still be addictive in certain situations. Here are some reasons why:

  1. Buprenorphine can produce mild euphoria: Although buprenorphine produces less euphoria than other opioids, it can still activate the brain’s reward system, leading to a feeling of pleasure. This can cause people to develop a psychological dependence on the drug.
  2. Misuse of Suboxone: When taken as prescribed, Suboxone is a safe and effective medication. However, some people may misuse it by taking more than specified or using it. This can increase the risk of addiction.
  3. Withdrawal symptoms: Suboxone can produce withdrawal symptoms if someone stops taking it abruptly. These symptoms can be uncomfortable and lead people to continue taking the drug to avoid them.
  4. Co-occurring mental health disorders: Addiction is often linked to underlying mental health disorders such as depression, anxiety, or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). People with these disorders may be more likely to develop an addiction to Suboxone.
  5. Length of treatment: Suboxone is usually prescribed for several months to a year. However, some people may continue to take it for extended periods, which can increase the risk of addiction.

Suboxone is less addictive than other opioids but can still be addictive in certain situations.

Do You Have These suboxone withdrawal symptoms? 

When someone stops taking Suboxone after prolonged use, they may experience withdrawal symptoms.

Withdrawal symptoms from Suboxone can include:

  1. Nausea and vomiting
  2. Diarrhoea
  3. Abdominal cramps
  4. Sweating
  5. Insomnia
  6. Anxiety
  7. Irritability
  8. Muscle aches and pains
  9. Runny nose
  10. Dilated pupils
  11. Rapid heartbeat
  12. High blood pressure

Don’t worry if you or your loved one has tense alcohol withdrawal symptoms, then don’t worry—all you have to do is contact Addicted Recovery

What is the Timeline of Suboxone Withdrawal 

The exact timeline of how long does suboxone withdrawal last can vary from person to person depending on factors such as the length of time a person has been taking Suboxone, their dose, physiology, and whether they were gradually tapering off the drug or stopping abruptly. Here is a general timeline of Suboxone withdrawal:

  • Acute withdrawal symptoms usually begin within the first 1-3 days after the last dose and can include sweating, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, body aches, and insomnia.
  • The acute withdrawal phase typically lasts 5-7 days but sometimes up to 14 days.
  • After the acute withdrawal phase, some people may experience a protracted withdrawal phase, which can last for weeks or months. Prolonged withdrawal symptoms can include depression, anxiety, insomnia, and cravings for opioids.
  • The intensity and duration of withdrawal symptoms can be influenced by the length of time a person has been taking Suboxone, their dose, and their physiology.
  • It’s important to note that the timeline of Suboxone withdrawal can be managed with the proper support and treatment. Medically supervised detox can help manage withdrawal symptoms and ensure your safety.

But keep hearing that Suboxone withdrawal symptoms are a normal part of recovery and can be managed with the proper support and treatment. Seeking professional help and support is critical to successfully managing withdrawal symptoms and achieving long-term recovery.

What to do if I have suboxone withdrawal?

If you are experiencing Suboxone withdrawal symptoms or want to know how long does suboxone withdrawal last, seeking professional help and support is essential. Here are some steps you can take:

  1. Contact your healthcare provider: You can guide managing Suboxone withdrawal symptoms and may recommend a medically supervised detox program.
  2. Consider a detox program: Medically supervised detox can help manage withdrawal symptoms and ensure your safety. Detox programs may involve tapering off Suboxone gradually or using other medications to manage withdrawal symptoms.
  3. Seek support: Joining a support group or seeking the help of a therapist or counselor can provide emotional support and guidance during the recovery process.
  4. Take care of your physical health: Regular exercise and eating a healthy diet can help manage Suboxone withdrawal symptoms.
  5. Avoid triggers: Avoiding triggers such as places or people associated with drug use can help prevent relapse.

It’s important to remember that Suboxone withdrawal symptoms are a normal part of the recovery process and can be managed with the proper support and treatment. Seeking professional help and support is critical to successfully managing withdrawal symptoms and achieving long-term recovery.

How Can You Avoid Suboxone Side effects? 

If you are using Suboxone and want to avoid suboxone side effects, follow your doctor’s instructions: It’s crucial to take Suboxone precisely as prescribed. 

Use only less frequently than directed. Always report any side effects to your doctor: If you experience them while taking Suboxone, immediately report them to your doctor. Your doctor may adjust your dosage or recommend other medications to manage side effects.

Likewise, you should avoid alcohol and other drugs: Mixing Suboxone with alcohol or other drugs can increase the risk of side effects and may be dangerous.

Seek Professional Help

Seeking professional help with Addicted Recovery can help you cope with the suboxone withdrawal symptoms. We have a specialized team of addiction doctors and therapists that can help you overcome the side effects of Suboxone and keep you on track with addiction recovery. So why wait? Start your addiction-free life today. How Long Does Suboxone Withdrawal Last

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Medically reviewed by DR.Reckitt.

Claire Wilcox, MD, is a general and addiction psychiatrist in private practice and an associate professor of translational neuroscience at the Mind Research Network in New Mexico; and has completed an addictions fellowship, psychiatry residency, and internal medicine residency. Having done extensive research in the area, she is an expert in the neuroscience of substance use disorders. Although she is interested in several topics in medicine and psychiatry, with a particular focus on substance use disorders, obesity, eating disorders, and chronic pain, her primary career goal is to help promote recovery and wellbeing for people with a range of mental health challenges.

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Disclaimer

AddictedRecovery aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with substance use disorder and mental health issues. Our team of licensed medical professionals research, edit and review the content before publishing. However, this information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. For medical advice please consult your physicians or ChoicePoint’s qualified staff.

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