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What To Avoid When Taking Low Dose Naltrexone

What To Avoid When Taking Low Dose Naltrexone

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What To Avoid When Taking Low Dose Naltrexone

Low-dose naltrexone (LDN) is typically well-tolerated, but there are some precautions that should be taken. It is important to avoid taking LDN with other medications that also target the opioid receptors in the body, such as high-dose naltrexone or opioid pain medications. Additionally, alcohol should be avoided while taking LDN, as it can increase the risk of adverse effects. If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, it is best to avoid taking LDN. It is also important to talk to your healthcare provider before taking LDN if you have a history of liver or kidney disease.

What is Naltrexone?

Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist medication that works by blocking the effects of opioids in the brain and body. It is used for the treatment of opioid and alcohol dependence. In higher doses (50 mg to 100 mg), it is used to treat opioid addiction by preventing patients from feeling the pleasurable effects of opioids and reducing cravings.

Low-dose naltrexone (LDN), on the other hand, is taken at doses between 3 mg and 4.5 mg. LDN is used off-label for various autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, such as multiple sclerosis, Crohn’s disease, and fibromyalgia. It is thought to work by modulating the immune system and reducing inflammation. However, the effectiveness of LDN for these conditions is still being studied, and more research is needed to determine its safety and efficacy.

Which opioids should I avoid with naltrexone?

Are you searching for What To Avoid When Taking Low Dose  Naltrexone? Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist, which means it blocks the effects of opioids in the body. As a result, you should avoid taking naltrexone with any prescription or non-prescription opioid medications, including:

  • Morphine
  • Hydrocodone
  • Oxycodone
  • Codeine
  • Fentanyl
  • Methadone
  • Heroin

Taking naltrexone with any of these medications may reduce or completely block the desired effects of the opioids and increase the risk of adverse effects. It is important to talk to your healthcare provider about all medications you are taking, including over-the-counter drugs and supplements, before starting naltrexone.

What To Avoid When Taking Low Dose Naltrexone

Which Food You Should Avoid When Taking Low Dose Naltrexone

There are no specific foods that should be avoided when taking low-dose naltrexone. However, as with any medication, it is important to talk to your healthcare provider about any dietary restrictions or concerns before starting low-dose naltrexone. They can advise you on how to use the medication safely and effectively.

In general, it is recommended to take low-dose naltrexone:

  • with a full glass of water, either on an empty stomach or with a small, 
  • low-fat meal
  • Avoid taking large or fatty meals, as they can affect the absorption of the medication.

If you experience any adverse effects after taking low-dose naltrexone, such as digestive problems, it is important to talk to your healthcare provider. They can determine if your symptoms are related to the medication or to other factors and provide appropriate treatment.

Is there any work routine i should follow when taking a Low Dose Naltrexone

There is no specific work routine that you need to follow when taking low-dose naltrexone. However, there are a few general recommendations that can help ensure that the medication is taken safely and effectively:

  1. Take the medication at the same time every day: Taking low-dose naltrexone at the same time each day can help establish a routine and improve adherence to the medication.
  2. Avoid missing doses: It is important to take low-dose naltrexone exactly as prescribed by your healthcare provider. Missing doses can reduce its effectiveness and increase the risk of adverse effects.
  3. Be mindful of side effects: Low-dose naltrexone can cause side effects, such as nausea, headache, and dizziness. If you experience any of these symptoms, talk to your healthcare provider, who may adjust your dose or provide additional treatment.
  4. Stay hydrated: Drink plenty of water when taking low-dose naltrexone to help prevent dehydration.
  5. Consult with your healthcare provider: If you have any questions or concerns about taking low-dose naltrexone, it is important to talk to your healthcare provider or contact Addicted Recovery. We can provide additional advice and support.

Remember, these recommendations are general and may vary depending on your individual needs and medical history. 

What Low Dose Naltrexone is Used For?

  1. Treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders: Low-dose naltrexone (LDN) is used off-label for the treatment of various autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, such as multiple sclerosis, Crohn’s disease, and fibromyalgia.
  2. Management of chronic pain: LDN has been studied for its potential role in managing chronic pain in conditions such as fibromyalgia, neuropathic pain, and chronic low back pain.
  3. Treatment of psychiatric conditions: LDN has been studied for its potential benefits in treating depression, anxiety, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.
  4. Reduction of symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases: LDN has been studied for its potential benefits in reducing symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease.
  5. Management of opioid dependence: LDN has been studied for its potential role in reducing opioid cravings and promoting abstinence in individuals with opioid dependence.
  6. Treatment of cancer: LDN has been studied for its potential role in treating cancer, but more research is needed to determine its safety and efficacy. It is currently not approved by regulatory agencies for the treatment of cancer.

What if I miss a dose of naltrexone?

If you miss a dose of naltrexone, you should take the missed dose as soon as you remember, unless it is close to the time for your next dose. In that case, you should skip the missed dose and take the next dose as scheduled. Do not take extra medicine to make up for a missed dose.

If you miss several doses, it is important to talk to your healthcare provider. They may adjust your dosage schedule or provide you with additional instructions on how to take the medication.

It is important to take naltrexone exactly as prescribed by your healthcare provider. Missing doses or not taking the medication as directed may reduce its effectiveness and increase the risk of adverse effects.

Naltrexone Use and Alcohol Dependence

Naltrexone is commonly used to treat alcohol dependence by reducing the urge to drink and preventing relapse. It works by blocking the pleasurable effects of alcohol in the brain and reducing cravings.

When used as directed, naltrexone can be effective in helping individuals overcome alcohol dependence and maintain abstinence. However, like all medications, it is important to take naltrexone exactly as prescribed by a healthcare provider and to follow a comprehensive treatment plan that includes therapy and support.

It is also important to avoid drinking alcohol while taking naltrexone, as it can increase the risk of adverse effects, such as nausea, vomiting, and liver damage. If you have any questions or concerns about taking naltrexone for alcohol dependence, it is important to talk to your healthcare provider.

Summary:

Low-dose naltrexone should be taken at the same time each day, as directed by your healthcare provider. It is important to avoid missing doses and to be mindful of side effects, such as nausea, headache, and dizziness. Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water and consult with your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. There are no specific foods or work routines that you need to follow when taking low-dose naltrexone, but it is important to follow your healthcare provider’s instructions and recommendations. Taking low-dose naltrexone as prescribed can help ensure its effectiveness in treating the intended condition.What To Avoid When Taking Low Dose Naltrexone


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Medically reviewed by DR.Reckitt.

Claire Wilcox, MD, is a general and addiction psychiatrist in private practice and an associate professor of translational neuroscience at the Mind Research Network in New Mexico; and has completed an addictions fellowship, psychiatry residency, and internal medicine residency. Having done extensive research in the area, she is an expert in the neuroscience of substance use disorders. Although she is interested in several topics in medicine and psychiatry, with a particular focus on substance use disorders, obesity, eating disorders, and chronic pain, her primary career goal is to help promote recovery and wellbeing for people with a range of mental health challenges.

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Disclaimer

AddictedRecovery aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with substance use disorder and mental health issues. Our team of licensed medical professionals research, edit and review the content before publishing. However, this information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. For medical advice please consult your physicians or ChoicePoint’s qualified staff.

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